February 5th

THE ELEVENTH EOTHINON GOSPEL
The Reading from the Holy Gospel according to Saint John 21:14-25

At that time, Jesus showed Himself to His Disciples after He was risen from the dead. When they had finished breakfast, Jesus said to Simon Peter, “Simon, son of Jonah, do you love Me more than these?” He said to Him, “Yes, Lord; Thou knowest that I love Thee.” He said to him, “Feed My lambs.” A second time He said to him, “Simon, son of Jonah, do you love Me?” He said to Him, “Yes, Lord; Thou knowest
that I love Thee.” He said to him, “Tend My sheep.” He said to him the third time, “Simon, son of Jonah, do you love Me?” Peter was grieved because He said to him the third time, “Do you love Me?” And he said to Him, “Lord, Thou knowest everything; Thou knowest that I love Thee.” Jesus said to him, “Feed My sheep. Truly, truly, I say to you, when you were young, you girded yourself and walked where you would; but when you are old, you will stretch out your hands, and another will gird you and carry you where you do not wish to go.”
(This He said to show by what death he was to glorify God.) And after this He said to him, “Follow Me.” Peter turned and saw following them the Disciple whom Jesus loved, who had lain close to His breast at the supper and had said, “Lord, who is it that is going to betray Thee?” When Peter saw him, he said to Jesus, “Lord, what about this man?” Jesus said to him, “If it is My will that he remain until I come, what is that to you? Follow Me!” The saying spread abroad among the brethren that this Disciple was not to die; yet Jesus did not say to him that he was not to die, but, “If it is My will that he remain until I come, what is that to you?” This is the Disciple who is bearing witness to these things, and who has written these things; and we know that his testimony is true. But there are also many other things which Jesus did; were every one of them to be written, I suppose that the world itself
could not contain the books that would be written. Amen.

THE EPISTLE
The Reading from the Second Epistle of St. Paul to St. Timothy 3:10-15

Timothy my son, you have observed my teaching, my conduct, my aim in life, my faith, my patience, my love, my steadfastness, my persecutions, and my sufferings; and what befell me at Antioch, at Iconium, and at Lystra. What persecutions I endured; yet from them all, the Lord rescued me. Indeed all who desire to live a godly life in Christ Jesus will be persecuted, while evil men and impostors will go
on from bad to worse, deceivers and deceived. But as for you, continue in what you have learned and have firmly believed, knowing from whom you learned it and how from childhood you have been acquainted with the sacred writings which are able to instruct you for salvation through faith in Christ Jesus.

THE GOSPEL
The Reading from the Holy Gospel according to St. Luke 18:10-14

The Lord spoke this parable: “Two men went up into the temple to pray, one a Pharisee and the other a tax collector. The Pharisee stood and prayed thus with himself, ‘God, I thank Thee that I am not like
other men, extortionists, unjust, adulterers, or even like this tax collector. I fast twice a week; I give tithes of all that I get.’ But the tax collector, standing far off, would not even lift up his eyes to Heaven, but beat his breast, saying, ‘God, be merciful to me a sinner!’ I tell
you, this man went down to his house justified rather than the other; for everyone who exalts himself will be humbled, but he who humbles himself will be exalted.”

ORTHOS
RESURRECTIONAL APOLYTIKION IN TONE EIGHT

From the heights Thou didst descend, O compassionate One, and Thou didst submit to the threeday burial, that Thou might deliver us from passion; Thou art our life and our Resurrection, O Lord, glory to Thee.

RESURRECTIONAL APOLYTIKION IN TONE EIGHT
Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit.

From the heights Thou didst descend, O compassionate One, and Thou didst submit to the threeday burial, that Thou might deliver us from passion; Thou art our life and our Resurrection, O Lord, glory to Thee.

APOLYTIKION OF THE PRESENTATION OF CHRIST IN TONE ONE
Both now and ever, and unto ages of ages. Amen.
Rejoice, O Virgin Theotokos, full of grace, for from thee arose the Sun of Justice, Christ our God, lighting those who are in darkness. Rejoice and be glad, O righteous elder, carrying in thine arms the Deliverer of our souls, Who granteth us Resurrection.

At the Divine Liturgy
RESURRECTIONAL APOLYTIKION IN TONE EIGHT

From the heights Thou didst descend, O compassionate One, and Thou didst submit to the threeday burial, that Thou might deliver us from passion; Thou art our life and our Resurrection, O Lord, glory to Thee.

APOLYTIKION OF THE PRESENTATION OF CHRIST IN TONE ONE
Rejoice, O Virgin Theotokos, full of grace, for from thee arose the Sun of Justice, Christ our God, lighting those who are in darkness. Rejoice and be glad, O righteous old man, carrying in thine arms the Deliverer of our souls, Who granteth us Resurrection.
The apolytikion of the Protection of the Most Holy Theotokos:
“Today the Virgin stands in the midst of the Church, and with choirs of Saints she invisibly prays to God for us. Angels and Bishops venerate Her, Apostles and prophets rejoice together, since for our sake she prays to the Eternal God!”

KONTAKION OF THE PRESENTATION OF CHRIST IN TONE ONE
Thou, O Christ God, Who by Thy Birth, didst sanctify the Virgin’s womb, and, as is meet, didst bless Simeon’s arms, and didst also come to save us; preserve Thy fold in wars, and confirm them whom Thou
didst love, for Thou alone art the Lover of mankind.

Sunday of the Publican and the Pharisee
Luke 18:10-14
From the Explanation of the Gospel of St. Luke
by Blessed Theophylact, Archbishop of Ochrid and Bulgaria

10-14. Two men went up into the temple to pray; the one a Pharisee, and the other a publican. The Pharisee stood and prayed thus within himself, God, I thank Thee, that I am not as other men are, extortioners, unjust, adulterers, or even as this publican. I fast twice in the week, I give tithes
of all that I possess. And the publican, standing afar off, would not lift up so much as his eyes unto heaven, but smote upon his breast, saying, God be merciful to me a sinner. I tell you, this man went down to his house counted righteous rather than the other: for every one that exalteth himself shall be humbled; and he that humbleth himself shall be exalted.
The Lord ceaselessly purges the passion of pride in many ways. This passion, more than any other, disturbs our thoughts, and for this reason the Lord always and everywhere teaches on this subject. Here He is purging the worst form of pride. For there are many offshoots of selflove.
Presumption, arrogance, and vainglory all stem from this root. But the most destructive of all these kinds of self-love is pride, for pride is contempt of God. When a man ascribes his accomplishments to himself, and not to God, this is nothing less than denial of God and opposition to Him. Therefore, like enemy to enemy, the Lord opposes this passion which is opposed to Him, and through this parable He promises to heal it. He directs this parable towards those who trust in themselves and who
do not attribute everything to God, and who, as a result, despise others.
He shows that when righteousness—which is marvelous in every other respect and sets a man close to God—takes pride as its companion, it casts that man into the lowest depths and makes demonic what was Godlike just a short time before.
The words of the Pharisee at first resemble the words of a grateful man.
For he says, God, I thank Thee. But the words that follow are full of
foolishness. He does not say, “that Thou hast made me to depart from
extortion and iniquities,” but Instead, “I thank Thee that I am not an
extortioner or worker of iniquity.” He attributes this accomplishment to
himself, as something done by his own strength. How can a man who
knows that what he has, he has received from God, compare other men
to himself unfavorably and judge them? Certainly, if a man believed that
he had received as a gift good things that in truth belong to God, he
would not despise other men. He would instead consider himself just as
naked as his fellow men in regards to virtue, except that by the mercy of
God his nakedness has been covered with a donated garment. The
Pharisee is proud, ascribing his deeds to his own strength, and that is
why he proceeds to condemn others. By saying that the Pharisee stood,

the Lord indicates his haughtiness and lack of humility. In the same way
that a humble-minded man is likewise humble in his demeanor, this
Pharisee by his bearing displays his pride. Although it is also said of the
publican that he stood, note what follows: he would not lift up so much
as his eyes unto heaven, so that he was stooped in posture. But the eyes
of the Pharisee, together with his heart, were lifted up to heaven in
boastful exaltation. Nevertheless, the manner in which the Pharisee
arranged the words of his prayer can still instruct us. First he says what
he is not, and then he declares what he is. After stating, God, I thank
Thee, that I am not as other men are, pointing to the failings of others,
then he declares his good deeds, that he fasts twice a week and gives
tithes of all that he possesses. The order of his prayer shows us that we
must first refrain from wickedness, and then set our hand to virtue. One
must not only turn away from evil, but also do good (Ps. 33:14). It is the
same for a man who wants to draw pure water from a muddy spring:
only after he has cleaned out the mud can he draw pure water.
Consider this as well: the Pharisee did not say, “I thank Thee that I am
not an extortioner or an adulterer, as other men are.” He could not endure
even the association of his name with such vile terms, and so he uses
them in the plural, casting these terms at other men, and avoiding the
singular, which might associate him with sin. Having said, I thank Thee,
that I am not as other men are, by contrast he points to himself, saying,
I fast twice in the Sabbath, meaning, twice in the week, for the week was
called “the Sabbath,” deriving its name from the last day of the week,
the day of rest. The day of rest was called Sabbat, and the week was
called Sabbata, being the plural form of Sabbat. Whence it is that mian
Sabatton is the first day of the week, which we call “the Lord’s Day”
(Sunday). Among the Hebrews mian means the same thing as first.
There is also a more profound explanation of this parable. Against the
passion of adultery, the Pharisee boasted of his fasting, for lustful desires
arise from eating and drinking to excess. By restraining his body through
fasting on Mondays and Thursdays, as was the practice of the Pharisees,
he kept himself far from such passions. He also resisted extortion and
injustice by giving tithes of all his possessions. “I am so opposed to
extortion and to wronging others,” he says, “that I give alms of
everything I have.” Some believe that a simple and single tithe is
prescribed by the law; but those who carefully examine the law will find
three forms of tithing prescribed. You may learn this from Deuteronomy
if you apply yourself diligently (Dt. 12:11,17).
So much for the Pharisee. Now we turn to the publican and observe that
he is the Pharisee’s exact opposite. He stood afar off, and kept himself
at a great distance, not only in physical location, but in his demeanor, in
his words, and by his compunction of heart. He was ashamed to lift up
his eyes to heaven, for he considered his eyes unworthy of heavenly
vision because they had desired to see and enjoy the good things of earth.
And he smote upon his breast, striking his heart, as it were, because of
its evil designs, and awakening it because it had been sleeping. The
publican said no other words than, God be merciful to me a sinner. By
doing this he went down to his house counted righteous, rather than the
other. For every proud heart is unclean in the Lord’s eyes, and the Lord
resisteth the proud but He giveth grace to the humble (Prov. 3:34, I Pet.
5:5).
But one might wonder why it is that the Pharisee is condemned for
speaking a few boastful words, while Job receives a crown for speaking
many such words (Job 29). The answer is that the Pharisee stood and
spoke these vain words under no compulsion, and he condemned others
for no reason. But with Job, his friends pressed him and bore down upon
him more fiercely than did his own calamities, telling him that he was
suffering these things because of his sins. Job was compelled to
enumerate his good deeds, but he did so for the glory of God, and so that
men would not be misled from the path of virtue. For if men came to
hear that Job was suffering because what he had done was sinful, they
would not act as Job had. As a result they would become haters of
strangers instead of hospitable to strangers, merciless instead of merciful,
and unrighteous instead of righteous; for such were the good deeds of
Job. Therefore Job enumerated his virtues so that others would not be
misled and harmed, and this was why he spoke as he did. Shall we not
say that his words, which may seem boastful, in fact are radiant with
humility? Oh that I were as in months past, he said, wherein God
preserved me! (Job 29:2) Do you see that he attributes everything to God
and does not judge others? Instead he is judged by his friends. But
condemnation rightly falls upon the Pharisee, who attributed everything
to himself and not to God, and judged others for no reason whatsoever.
For every one that exalteth himself shall be humbled and condemned by
God; and he that humbleth himself when he is condemned by others shall
be exalted and counted righteous by God. The Lord is saying, “You, 0
Christian, be the first to tell your sins, so that you may be counted
righteou

Posted in 2017, Bulletin